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Moving Forward

Moving Forward

100 years and Counting

By Rhonda Amtower

Rhonda Amtower

Rhonda Amtower WMA National President 2018 – 2020

What a fabulous celebration we experienced at our recent Biennial Convention and Professional Development Symposium as we commemorated 100 years of women’s service in the Marine Corps.  We turned the corner on a historic and successful 100 year run as women in the Corps. During the convention we recognized the incredible achievements and history that we as Marines have made during the last 100 years.  WMA is a key part of promoting and preserving that history, having been a part of this for 58 of the 100 illustrious years.  Just like Opha May Johnson is a key part of our legacy of the history of women in the Marine Corps, WMA too plays a key role in that legacy and we can all step up and be like Opha May, be the first, open more doors to pave the way for women in the future.  Whether we be Veteran Marines or on active duty we can all play a part in making history today for our future of tomorrow.

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2018 WMA Convention Courtesy Resolutions

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2018 COURTESY RESOLUTIONS

WHEREAS THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS HAVE CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE WOMEN MARINES ASSOCIATION (WMA) AND THE 30TH BIENNIAL WMA CONVENTION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM; AND

WHEREAS THE 2018 CONVENTION IS DEDICATED TO THE WOMEN MARINES’ 100-YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION AND TO ALL WOMEN WHO HAVE SERVED IN THIS LEGACY; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT

RESOLVED THAT THE ASSOCIATION WISHES TO EXPRESS OUR GENUINE AND HEARTFELT GRATITUDE TO:

  1. THE MAYOR OF WASHINGTON, DC, THE HONORABLE MURIEL BOWSER, FOR HER GREETING TO THE WOMEN MARINES ASSOCIATION IN HONOR OF THEIR 100 YEARS OF SERVICE;
  2. THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA GOVERNOR, THE HONORABLE RALPH NORTHAM, FOR PROCLAIMING WOMEN MARINE CENTENNIAL WEEK AND FOR TAKING THIS OPPORTUNITY TO HONOR WOMEN MARINES PUBLICLY WITH BOTH A LETTER OF WELCOME AND A CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION;
  3. THE DIRECTOR OF THE MAYOR’S OFFICE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, WASHINGTON, DC, MR. ELY S. ROSS, FOR A LETTER OF WELCOME;
  4. THE GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND, THE HONORABLE LARRY HOGAN, FOR CONGRATULATING AND WELCOMING THE WOMEN MARINES TO THE GREAT STATE OF MARYLAND THROUGH HIS PROCLAMATION;

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WMA Area 1 News

The Women Marines Association

Area 1 News

Submitted by Jamie DePaola

 

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What a great time we had at the National Convention in Washington, D.C. to celebrate 100 years of women in the Corps!  We had over 30 hard – charger Marines representing all six chapters from Area 1. Most were new to WMA so we arranged to sit together at the banquets and get to know one another as a team.  It was a very unique and memorable opportunity, indeed.  We also combined forces for a PX table and enjoyed more camaraderie. Continue Reading »

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Peg Brady WWII Marine

A 97-year-old Syracuse woman remembers her time in the U.S. Marines: ‘I just loved it’

One of the first female Marines looks back at the job she loved

 

 

 

Liverpool, N.Y. — The moment that changed Peg Bandy’s life was 80 years ago.

But she remembers it like it was yesterday.

She was watching an uncle pack up to go on a military training expedition during World War II. I want to do that, she said.

“He said, ‘Well Margaret, they’ll never let women in the military. So you can forget about that,'” Bandy recalled.

He was the first person she went to see after she completed boot camp with the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserve during World War II.

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Bea Arthur, US Marine

Bea Arthur, US Marine

 

BY: Kali Martin

April 12, 2018

Bernice Frankel’s Official Military Personnel File reveals a Golden Girl’s WWII service history.

Before she took to Broadway stages and became a beloved Golden Girl, Bernice Frankel, better known today as Bea Arthur, joined thousands of other women paving the way for women in the armed forces. Details of her time as a US Marine can be found in her Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) available from the National Archives. Housed at a massive facility in St. Louis, Missouri, these military records hold a wealth of information on individuals.

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Newton Marine Honored

Newton Marine honored for making handler history

100th anniversary of women in the U.S. Marine Corps celebrated

Mady McKim meets the current Marine Corps mascot, Chesty XV, during the convention celebrating 100 years of women in the Corps in Washington, D.C.

The United States had a banner year in 1918: An influenza epidemic swept the nation, World War I ended and for the first time since Congress ordered the formation of the United States Marine Corps in 1798, women joined its ranks.

One hundred years later, women from across the country gathered in Washington, D.C., from Aug. 29 to Sept. 3 for a convention celebrating a century of women’s service in the Marines.

Mady McKim, a French immigrant and retired Marine who served a total of 12 years both on active duty and in the reserves, traveled from Newton to D.C. for the convention. She revisited her old stomping grounds where former Commandant Carl Mundy Jr.’s wife, Linda, called her away from her duties to snack on milk and cookies, re-lived the instant camaraderie of Marine Corps life and received recognition for making history during her time in the Marine Corps as the first female mascot handler.

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Thin Line of Tradition

The Thin Line of Tradition

The traditions of the Marine Corps, its history, its flags, its uniforms, its insignia—the Marine Corps way of doing things—make the Corps what it is [and set it distinctively apart from other military organizations and services].

These traditions give the Marine Corps its flavor, and are the reason why the Corps cherishes its past, its ways of acting and speaking, and its uniforms. These things foster the discipline, valor, loyalty, aggressiveness, and readiness, which make the term ” ‘Marine’ … signify all that is highest in military efficiency and soldierly virtue.”

One writer on Marine traditions nailed down their importance in [the following] words: “As our traditions, our institutions, and even our eccentricities—like live coral—develop and toughen, so the Corps itself develops and toughens.”

And remember: whenever the Marine Corps is impoverished by the death of a tradition, you are generally to blame. Traditions are not preserved by books and museums, but by faithful adherence on the part of all hands—you especially.

—”The Marine Corps Officer’s Guide,” 1964 edition